Tuesday, September 4, 2012

99 Beautiful Names of Allâh- Asmaa Al Husnaa

 

 

Alphabetically Sorted Index of 99 Beautiful Names of Allâh

(click on any number for detailed definition and audio recitation)
'Adl The Just, The Equitable29
'Afûw The Forgiver, The Effacing82
Ahad The One, The Only One67
âkhir The Last, The End and Ultimate74
'Alî The Highest, The Exalted36
'Alîm The All-Knowing, The Omniscient19
Awwal The First, The Pre-Existing73
'Azîm The Supreme Glory, The Most Grand33
'Azîz The Mighty, The Eminent8
Badî' The Wonderful Originator, The Awesome Inventor95
Bâ'ith The Awakener, The Resurrector49
Bâqî The Everlasting, The Ever-Present96
Bâri' The Maker from Nothing, The Evolver12
Barr The Gracious Benefactor, The Source of Goodness79
Basîr The All-Seeing, The All-Perceiving27
BâsitThe Expander, The Unfolder21
tin The Hidden, The Inner76
Dârr The Corrector, The Distresser91
Dhû-l-Jalâli wal-Ikrâm The Lord of Majesty and Generosity85
FattâhThe Opener, The Revealer18
Ghaffâr The All-Forgiving, The Absolver14
Ghafûr The Forgiving, The Pardoner34
Ghanî The Self-Sufficient, The Independent88
Hâdî The Guide, The Leader on the Right Path94
HafîzThe Preserver, The Protector38
Hakam The Judge, The Arbitrator28
Hakîm The Perfectly Wise, The Most Judicious46
Halîm The Forbearing, The Calm-Abiding32
Hamîd The Praiseworthy, The Laudable56
Haqq The Truth, The Only Reality51
Hasîb The Accounter, The Reckoner40
Hayy The Ever-Living, The Alive62
Jabbâr The Restorer, The Repairer9
Jalîl The Majestic, The Glorious41
Jâmi' The Gatherer, The Uniter87
Kabîr The Greatest, The Most Great37
Karîm The Generous, The Bountiful42
Khabîr The Inner-Aware, The Reality-Knower31
KhâfidThe Humbler, The One who Softens22
Khâliq The Creator, The Planner11
Latîf The Subtle, The Gracious, The Refined30
Majîd The All-Glorious, The Majestic48
Mâjid The Noble, The Generous65
Mâlik al-Mulk The Master of the Kingdom84
Malik The Ruler, The King 3
Mâni' The Preventer, The Defender90
Matîn The Firm, The Steadfast54
Mu'akhkhir The Delayer, The Postponer72
Mubdi' The Starter, The Beginner, The Originator 58
Mudhill The Disgracer, The Dishonorer25
Mughnî The Bestower of Wealth, The Fulfiller of Needs89
Muhaimin The Protector, The Bestower of Security7
Muhsî The Reckoner, The Appraiser57
MuhThe Giver of Life, The Reviver60
Mu'îd The Restorer, The Renewer59
Mu'izz The Bestower of Honor, The Strengthener24
Mujîb The Fulfiller of Prayers, The Responsive44
Mu'min The Remover of Fear, The Giver of Tranquility6
Mumît The Creator of Death, The Life-Taker61
Muntaqim The Avenger, The Inflictor of Retribution81
Muqaddim The Expediter, The Promoter71
Muqît The Nourisher, The Sustainer39
MuqsitThe Equitable, The Just86
Muqtadir The All-Determining, The Prevailing70
Musawwir The Fashioner, The Bestower of Forms13
Muta'âli The Supremely Exalted, The Most High78
Mutakabbir The Supremely Great, The Perfection of Greatness10
Nâfi' The Creator of Good, The Auspicious92
Nûr The Light, The Illuminator, The Enlightenment93
QâbidThe Withholder, The Restrainer20
Qâdir The Able, The Empowered, The Capable69
Qahhâr The Ever-Dominant, The Conqueror15
Qawî The Inexhaustible Strength, The Supremely Strong53
Qayyûm The Self-Existing, The Self-Subsisting63
Quddûs The Holiest, The Most Pure 4
Râfi' The Exalter, The Uplifter23
Rahîm The Most Merciful, The Most Compassionate2
RahmânThe Lovingly Beneficent, Most Kind and Gracious1
Raqîb The Watchful, The All-Observing43
RashîdThe Appointer to the Right Path, The Director98
Ra'ûfThe Kind, The Tenderly Merciful and Consoling83
RazzâqThe Supplier, The Provider17
Sabûr The Patiently-Enduring, The Long-Suffering99
Salâm The Source of Peace, The Flawless5
Samad The Satisfier of All Needs, The Eternal68
Samî' The All-Hearing, The Ever-Listening26
Shahîd The Witness, The Testifier50
Shakûr The Most Grateful, The Most Appreciative35
Tawwâb The Acceptor of Repentance, The Oft-Forgiving80
Wadûd The Loving-Kindness, The Most Affectionate47
Wahhâb The Liberal Bestower, The Giver of Gifts16
hid The One, The Manifestation of Unity66
Wâjid The Finder, The Resourceful64
Wakîl The Trustee, The Advocate52
Wâlî The Sole Governor, The Friendly Lord77
Walî The Protecting Friend, The Nearby Guardian55
Wârith The Inheritor of All, The Supreme Heir97
Wâsi' The All-Embracing, The All-Pervading45
Zâhir The Manifest, The Evident75

al-'Adl audiocaligraphy

The Equitable, The Impartial, The Just

The One who rectifies and sets matters straight in a fair, impartial and equitable manner.
The One who always acts justly. The One who delivers absolute justice.
The One whose wisdom of justice is based upon complete knowledge of past, present and future.
From the root 'a-d-l which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to act justly, fairly
to be equitable, impartial
to adjust properly, to make even
to straighten, to rectify, to establish justice
to balance, counterbalance, to make equal, uniform
to turn one away from something, rightly direct
to make comfortable with what is right
The term 'Adl is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.
Although a situation may seem unfair to us due to our limited understanding, the Supreme Justice is absolute and unerring in fairness and equality.
(Also written as: al-'adl, al-adl, the Impartial One: ya 'adl, ya adl)



al-Hâdî audiocaligraphy

The Guide, The Leader, The Guide of the Right Path

The One who continually shows the right way. The One who kindly guides aright.
The One who sends prophets and messengers to guide mankind. The One who guides hearts to a knowledge of the Divine essence.
The One who is the source of all guidance. The One who faithfully continues to guide aright until the goal is finally attained.

From the root h-d-y which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to guide rightly
to show with kindness the proper path
to guide on the right path until reaching the goal
to guide aright
to lead the right way
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 25:31
Rashîd refers primarily to being directed to, or set upon, the appointed right path with supreme certainty of the intended outcome, while Hâdî refers primarily to the continuing guidance, leadership and direction that is kindly provided to reach the path and also along the path until the goal is achieved.

(Also written as al-hadi, al-haadee, the guide: ya hadi, ya haadee)

al-'Afûw audiocaligraphy

The Pardoner, The Most Forgiving, The Effacing, The Eliminator of Sins

The One who blots out and leaves no trace of any sin or fault.
The One who passes over and absolves any fault.
The One who can remove and obliterate all traces of wrong actions.
The One who can make any sin, error or fault disappear.
From the root 'a-f-a which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to forgive, pardon
to pass over, forgo, absolve
to obliterate all traces, efface, remove
to kill-off, allow to die
to turn away from punishing, not see, annul
to make unapparent, imperceptible
to give spontaneously, to give without constraint
to give more than what is due
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 4:99
The words Ghafûr and Ghaffâr denote simply forgiving or protecting, while 'Afûw indicates complete removal or obliteration of the condition.
The classical Arabic dictionary Taj al-Arûs offers a beautiful metaphor wherein 'afûw is said to be like a mighty desert wind which completely obliterates the footprints in the sand.
Abû Hâmid al-Ghazâlî wrote:
Man's share in this name should be clear: he should be one who excuses everyone who harms him, doing good for him instead, just the same as he sees God most high doing good in this world to the disobedient as well as the disbeliever, rather than bring them swiftly to punishment.
'Afûw and Muntaqim are complementary attributes. 'Afûw is the forgiver, while Muntaqim is the avenger.
(Also written as al-afuw, al-afoo, al-afoow, al-afu, al-afuww, al-affuw, or al-afuwwun, the Most Forgiving: ya afuw, ya afoo, ya afoow, ya afu, ya afuww, ya affuw, or ya afuwwun)


al-Ahad audiocaligraphy

The One and Only, The Unity, The Sole One

The One who has ever been and ever remains alone. The incomparable, unequalled, indivisible One. The One who is the essence of Unity. The Sole One. The One and Only One.
The One who has no second [that shares] in the lordship, nor in the essence, nor in the attributes. The One who was not begotten and has never begotten.
The One who depends upon no other, and to Whom there is no likeness. The One in whom all names, attributes and relationships are united.
From the root a-h-d which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be one
to be the only one, one alone, sole
to unite, unify
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 112:1
The ancient roots of Ahad point toward to the essential qualities which describe Unity, while the ancient roots of Wâhid point toward the manifestations which arise from that Unity.
That which is Ahad cannot be divided into parts, or any parts distinguished. That which is Wâhid has the appearance of being divisible into separate parts, or being comprised of separate parts.
Ahad is used to refer to the One, the sole One, the One who was not begotten and who has ever been alone, the One who has no second, the Indivisible.
hid indicates the solitary Starting Point, the One Source, the First of the Many, from which all of creation has arisen as manifestations of Unity. From a human point of view, the manifestations may appear separate and diverse, but in reality they are One.
(Also written as al-ahad, the One and Only: ya ahad)




al-âkhir audiocaligraphy

The Last, The End and The Ultimate

The One who remains after all of creation has passed away.
The One who is the last, the conclusion, the ultimate.
The One who is behind all of creation. The One beyond whom there is nothing.

From the root a-kh-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to put back, to put behind, to be latter
to postpone, to put at the end
to be last, final, ultimate
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 57:3
Awwal (first) and âkhir (last) are complementary attributes.
The name al-Mu'akhkhir (the delayer) also comes from this same a-kh-r root.
(Also written as al-akhir, al-aakhir, The One Who Remains: ya akhir, ya aakhir)



al-'Alî audiocaligraphy

The Exalted, The Most High

The One Who is above and exceeds all others. The Most High, above whom there is nothing higher.
The One whose rank and station are the Most High.
The One who is above and surpasses all that has ever been, all that there now is, and all that shall ever be.

From the root 'a-l-w which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be high, elevated, lofty
to be exalted, to rise up, to ascend
to be higher, to exceed, surpass
to overcome, overwhelm
to advance, promote, rise above
to mount, be overtop, eminent
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 2:255
(Also written as al-ali, al-aliy, al-alee, al-aliyy, al-aliyyun, the Most High: ya ali, ya aliy, ya aliyy, ya aliyyun)



al-'Alîm audiocaligraphy

The All-Knowing, The Omniscient, The Certain-Knowing

The One who comprehends everything. The One who is intuitively aware of all things, even before they happen.
The One who knows with certainty. The One whose knowledge of past, present and future is deeply rooted and complete in all respects.
One from whom no knowledge is concealed. The One who is aware of the complete details of all matters. The Omniscient One.

From the root 'a-l-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to have knowledge, be cognizant, be certain
to be aware, thoroughly informed
to be find out, gather information
to have intuitive knowledge
to have firmly rooted knowledge of the minute particulars
to act according to knowledge
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 2:32
Related names:
'Alîm denotes knowing with certainty, especially intuitive knowing, omniscience.
Khabîr denotes an understanding of the inner qualities, secrets and true reality.
(Also written as al-alim, al-aleem, al-aliim, the All-Knowing: ya alim, ya aleem, ya aliim)

al-Awwal audiocaligraphy

The First One, The Pre-Existing

The One who is the first, the beginning, the foremost. The Prior-Existing One who existed before all of creation.
The One who was before any thing or any being. The One who is the cause of all the worlds.
The One who is the beginning of every action, command or thought.

From the root a-w-l which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be first, principle, to be before
to come back to, to return
to precede, to be the first part
to be foremost
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 57:3
Awwal (first) and âkhir (last) are complementary attributes.
(Also written as al-awwal, al-awal, the First: ya awwal, ya awal)



al-'Azîz audiocaligraphy

The Mighty, The Strong, Dignified and Powerful, The Eminent

The One who is the most Powerful and most Cherished. The victorious One whose strength, glory and power are overwhelming and cannot be overcome or resisted.
The One whose dignity, majesty and power are unique, precious and unattainable by mankind. The One whose respectability and nobility are above all others. The One who is the ultimate in honor and nobility.
The One who has complete mastery over all of creation. The One who overcomes everything. The One who is incomparable and unparalleled. The One who is the cherished source of all strength, power and potency.

From the root '-z-z which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be mighty, potent, strong, powerful
to be high, elevated, noble, exalted
to be honorable, noble, glorious, illustrious
to be indomitable, invincible
to be respected, cherished, dear
to be scarce, rare, precious, unattainable
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23
(Also written as al-'aziz, al-'azîzun, al-aziz, al-azeez, al-aziiz, the Mighty: ya 'aziz, ya 'azîzun, ya aziz, ya azeez)

al-Badî' audiocaligraphy

The Wonderful Originator, The Unprecedented and Incomparable Inventor, The Absolute Cause

The marvelous One who originates, commences, invents and creates all that exists, without any model or material.
The One whose incomparable will-power first brings into existence all of the unique and amazing creation without any similarity to anything else that has ever existed.
The One who creates in wonderful, awesome, amazingly original ways that have no precedent whatsoever.

From the root b-d-'a which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to introduce, originate, start, innovate
to do for the first time, and not after the similitude of anything pre-existing
to cause to exist, to bring into existence
to devise, to uniquely contrive
to be amazing, outstanding, marvelous, superlative, incomparable
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 2:117
In honoring the One Creator, it has been said that mankind does not truly create, but rather merely discovers that which Allâh has already created.
The ancient Semitic roots of b-d-' point toward everything which is blossoming into existence and becoming apparent or exposed, with a sense of separation and individuality.
The expression al-Badî' refers to the Creator as well as that which is created.
In some Classical Arabic literature, the participles Mubdi' and Badî' are used interchangeably. However, in many Qur'ân commentaries, these terms are used to describe slightly different attributes, with the name Mubdi' emphasizing the initiation of creation, while Badî' emphasizes the awesome innovation of such creation.
Related names:
Mubdi' is the One who initiates, starts or begins the production or creation of all things.
Badî' is the One who creates in awesome, wonderful, amazingly original ways that have no precedent whatsoever.
Mu'îd is the One who repeats, restores and revives that which had been previously invented.
Bâri' is the way the One works with substances, often creating from existing matter, making and evolving that which is free and clear of imperfections, free and clear of any other thing.
Khâliq is the One who continues to plan, measure out and create and who has the power to change things from one state to another, in and out of existence.
Musawwir is the One who arranges forms and colors, and who is the shaper of beauty.
(Also written as al-badi, al-badee, al-badii, the Wonderful Originator: ya badi, ya badee, ya badii)


al-Bâ'ith audiocaligraphy

The Awakener, The Resurrector, The Arouser, The Dispatcher

The One who chooses who shall awaken and who shall be sent forth.
The One who decides who to raise up. The One who awakens the dead.
The One who resurrects. The One who rouses up mankind.
The One who sends Light into the worlds. The One who dispatches messengers into the world.

From the root b-'a-th which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to call forth, awaken
to raise up from sleep or death
to resurrect
to delegate, consign
to send, send out, make manifest
The term Bâ'ith is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.
(Also written as al-baith, al-baaith, the Awakener: ya baith, ya baaith)



al-Bâqî audiocaligraphy

The Everlasting, The Eternal, The Ever-Enduring, The Ever-Present

The One who has always existed and who will never cease to be. The One whose existence has neither beginning nor end. The One whose existence is beyond the realm of time.
The One who existed before all of creation, and who will remain after all of this creation has come and gone.
The One who is everlasting, perpetual, beginning-less, endless. The One whose existence is eternal. The One who remains forever, unaffected by time.
From the root b-q-y which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to remain, continue, endure
to be permanent, everlasting, constant
to survive forever
to be incessant, continuous, endless
The term Bâqî is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.
The term Abqâ, also from the b-q-y root, is used in the Qur'ân (20:73) where it is commonly translated as the Most Lasting, Ever Lasting or Most Abiding.
The term baqiyyah is used in the Qur'ân (11:116) to describe persons of excellence, those who possess spiritual understanding and inner discrimination, those who possess a quality of attending to that which is eternal.
The related term baqâ', which is from the same b-q-y root, is often translated as eternal life. In the state of baqâ' bi-llâh there is a return from the ephemeral to the eternal, a shift from the egocentric to the Divine, where all that remains is the eternal Thou. The return to the Everlasting, the return from one's worldly preoccupation with the ephemeral, the shift away from one's own ego being treated as the center of life, is often called fanâ' which literally means to fade away, dwindle, recede or come to an end.
yâ bâqî anta al-bâqî is a powerful wazîfa which can be translated as o' Everlasting One, Thou art The Everlasting One.

(Also written as al-baqi, al-baaqee, al-baaqee, the Ever-Lasting: ya baqi, ya baaqee, ya baaqee)




al-Bâri' audiocaligraphy

The Maker, The Producer, The Evolver, The Maker from Nothing

The One who creates form out of nothing. The One who creates with no model or similarity.
The One who evolves and re-creates that which exists, both physically and spiritually.
The One who sends new forms into existence.
The One who manifests that which is in perfect harmony and proportion, without blemish or fault.

From the root b-r-' which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to create, to form out of nothing, to manifest
to create using pre-existing matter, evolve
to be individual, free and clear of another thing
to be free and clear of fault or blemish
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:24
The Qur'ân commentary of al-Baydâwi says that the primary meaning of the root b-r-' is to denote a thing's becoming free and clear of another thing, either by by being released or by being created.
The ancient Semitic roots point toward a manifestation or emanation which is the fruition of a great power, and which contains the potentiality of that which brought it into being.
Related names:
Bâri' denotes the way the One works with substances, often creating from existing matter, making and evolving that which is free and clear of any other thing, free and clear of imperfections.
Badî' denotes the One who creates in wonderful, amazingly original ways that have no precedent whatsoever, ways that are awesome innovation.
Khâliq denotes the One who continues to plan, measure out and create, and who has the power to change things from non-existing to existing.
Musawwir denotes the One who arranges forms and colors, and who is the shaper of beauty.
Mubdi' denotes the One who starts or begins all things, or that which has precedence given to it.
(Also written as al-bari, al-baari, the Producer.)


al-Barr audiocaligraphy

The Kindly and Gracious Benefactor, The Righteous, The Source of Goodness

The One who is kind, gentle and ample in goodness. The One who is the doer of good, both materially and spiritually.
The One who is kindly and gracious. The One from whom every good deed comes. The One who is the source of all kindness and goodness.
The One who bountifully bestows the gifts of tolerance, gentleness, goodness and kindness. The One who is ever-merciful and compassionate.

From the root b-r-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be devoted, affectionate, gentle
to be just and proper, honest, truthful
to have regard for the circumstances of another
to be beneficent, to bestow bountiful gifts
to reward for service, recompense
to behave courteously, to do good
to be benign, gracious, kindly
to be pious, virtuous, righteous
to be ample, extensive
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 52:28
(Also written as al-barr, al-baar, the Doer of Good: ya barr, ya baar)



al-Basîr audiocaligraphy

The All-Seeing, The All-Perceiving, The All-Comprehending

The One whose insight sees all things clearly, both the apparent and the hidden. The One who sees and understands all that has been, and all that will be.
The One who has insight into all things. The One who perceives every detail. The One who understands all things, both outer and inner.
The One who has given to mankind the outer eye of the body, and the inner eye of the heart.

From the root b-s-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to see, behold, notice
to understand, to know
to perceive, to have insight
to be acutely aware
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 17:1
(Also written as al-basir, al-baseer, the All-Seeing: ya basir, ya baseer)



al-Bâtin audiocaligraphy

The Hidden, The Secret One, The Inner One, The Knower of Hidden Things

The One who is veiled from our sensory perception. The One who is unseen, yet whose existence and essence are made known through signs.
The One who knows the inner states, inner circumstances and inner thoughts of all of creation.
The One who enters unseen into all of creation. The One who is concealed within all of creation. The One who is the secret inner companion.

From the root b-t-n which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be concealed, to lie hidden
to penetrate into, to be inside
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 57:3
tin and Zâhir are opposites.
Zâhir is that which is outward, manifest, apparent, visible.
tin is that which is inward, concealed, obscured.
(Also written as al-batin, al-baatin, the Hidden: ya batin, ya baatin )



ad-Dârr audiocaligraphy

The Correcter, The Balancer, The Distresser, The Afflicter, The Punisher

The One whose wisdom may choose to use forceful corrections.
The One who creates adversity or distress in order to discourage or correct wrongful behavior.
The One whose wisdom may use situations that have an outward appearance of being harmful.

From the root d-r-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to have an opinion that is opposing
to apply forceful correction
to do an act that is disliked
to make inconvenient, annoy, distress
to cause adversity, afflict
to harm, injure, hurt

The name Dârr is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.
Nâfi' (creator of good) is the opposite of Dârr (distresser)
The names Dârr and Nâfi' are often used together to acknowledge the way that balance and harmony are established and maintained. These opposing attributes are often inseparable, since that which is the sweetest nectar to one person may be bitter poison to another.
Such opposites help to make one aware that every action accomplishes some purpose and is, in the grand scheme of things, subservient to the all-knowing hand of Allâh, through whom balance and harmony are created and maintained... even if we don't understand.
Abû Hâmid al-Ghazâlî wrote:
Do not suppose that poison kills or harms by itself.... or that kings or men or satan, or any creature, are capable of good or evil, benefit or harm, by themselves. For all of these are subservient causes from which nothing proceeds except that for which they were utilized.
There is a grand intelligence who has a plan that is beyond our understanding, and these pairs of opposites serve to remind us to constantly focus our attention on the glory of the One, regardless of whether the situation is smooth and easy or rough and difficult.

There is only one virtue
and one sin for a soul on the path:
virtue when he is conscious of God
and sin when he is not.
Abu Hashim Madani

The phrase ad-Dârr un Nâfi' is is often recited to honor these two complementary attributes.ad darr un nafi
(Also written as al-darr, al-daarr, al-dzarr, al-tharr, al-thaarr, the Correcter, the Distresser: ya darr, ya daarr, ya dzarr, ya thaarr)



Dhû-l-Jalâli wa-l-Ikrâm audiocaligraphy

Lord of Majesty and Generosity, Lord of Glory and Honor

The One who is most precious, revered and honored. The One who is the glorious and majestic lord of all generosity and bounty.
The One who is the possessor of all glory and honor. The One who is the owner of every manner of blessing, perfection, honor and majesty.
The One whose presence bestows majesty and generosity. The One who is the source of awesome splendor and abundance.

This beautiful Arabic phrase begins with a pronoun, followed by two attributes of Allâh.
Dhû (pronounced "thoo") = Lord of, Possessor of
l = al = the
Jalâl = Majesty, Glory
wa = and
l = al = the
Ikrâm = Generosity, Bounty
The attributes of Allâh in this phrase are based on the root j-l-l meaning:
to be supremely great
to be glorious, majestic
to be sublime
to be high, lofty, far above, independent
and the root k-r-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be noble, high minded, generous
to be highly esteemed, honored, prized, valued
to be excellent, precious, valuable, rare
to be productive, fruitful, bountiful
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 55:27
Though certain benefits and gifts may arrive through human hands, one must offer all praise and honor to the True Source from which all blessings come, the One who is the Lord, Possessor and Bestower of Majesty and Bounty.
The Beautiful Names al-Jalîl and al-Karîm are also derived from these same two roots. The words jalâl (glory) and ikrâm (generosity) are verbal nouns, while jalîl (glorious) and karîm (generous) are adjectives.
The demonstrative pronoun Dhû literally means with, in, on, or of, but in this phrase from the Qur'ân it is often translated as Lord of, Owner of, or Possessor of.
Note that Dhû is pronounced thoo.
When used as an invocation, Dhû changes to Dha, as in Yâ Dhal-Jalâli wal-Ikrâm.
(Also written as dhul jalali wal ikram, dhal jalali wal ikram, the Lord of Majesty and Bounty: ya dhul jalali wal ikram, ya dhal jalali wal ikram)



al-Ghanî audiocaligraphy

The Self-Sufficient, The Wealthy, The Independent One

The One who is self-sufficient. The One without need of anything. The One who transcends all needs.
The One who is completely satisfied. The One who is free from any wants. The One who is free from any dependence.
The One who flourishes without help or aid of any sort, yet who is needed by all. The One upon whose wealth and riches all others depend.

From the root gh-n-y which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be free from wants or needs
to be self-sufficient, independent
to be able to do without help from others
to be content, satisfied
to be rich, wealthy, flourishing
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 6:133
Ghanî denotes the One whose essential nature is independence, self-sufficiency and supreme wealth.
Mughnî is from this same gh-n-y root and denotes specific deeds done by the One in bestowing wealth.

(Also written as al-ghaniy, al-ghani, al-ghanee, al-ghanii, the Self-Sufficient, ya ghaniy, ya ghani, ya ghanee, ya ghanii)
al-Ghaffâr audiocaligraphy

The All-Forgiving, The Absolver, The Veiler of Sins and Faults, The Most Protecting One

The One who accepts repentance and veils or forgives our faults and sins, time and time again. The One who sets us free from the guilt and shame of our own sins and faults, such that we may discover inner harmony and peace.
The One who protects us from the effects of our faults and sins, both in the present world and the future. The One who accepts repentance and sets aright our faults and sins.
The One who veils, forgives or transforms our faults and sins in such a manner that we may go on without guilt or shame. The One who can set aright, or transform, wrong deeds and change them into what become good deeds.

From the root gh-f-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to cover, veil, conceal, hide
to pardon, to forgive, to set aright
to cover a thing to protect it from dirt
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 40:3
Abû Hâmid al-Ghazâlî said:
Every creature is bound to have perfection and imperfection, or ugliness and beauty, so whoever overlooks the ugly and mentions only the beautiful is one who shares in this attribute.
Note that the root gh-f-r has given rise to three Beautiful Names that are all used in the Qur'ân: Ghaffâr,Ghafûr and Ghâfir. However, only Ghaffâr and Ghafûr were included in the list of 99 Names narrated by Tirmidhi.
In Qastalânî's commentary on Bukhârî, it is said that the root gh-f-r means a covering or protection which is either between man and the commission of sin [protecting, or watching over], or between sin and the effects of that sin [forgiving, veiling or concealing].
In al-Nihâyah (a dictionary of hadîth), it is said that Ghâfir refers to the One who protects us from the commission of sins, and that Ghafûr refers to the One who forgives our sins and faults.
Sheikh Tosun Bayrak portrays the differences as:
... al-Ghâfir, the veiler of our faults from the eyes of other men; al-Ghafûr, who keeps the knowledge of our faults even from the angels; and al-Ghaffâr who relieves us from the suffering of continual remembrance of our faults.
The Arabic word astaghfirullâh (sometimes written as astghfrallâh or estaferallah) is from this same gh-f-r root, and is an invocation of Divine Protection having a range of possible connotations that include Allâh please forgive me, Allâh please hide away my faults, Allâh please watch over me and protect me from faults.
The Arabic lexicon and commentary Tâj al-'Arûs reminds us that truly asking for forgiveness must be by both word and deed, not by the tongue alone.
The names Ghafûr, Ghaffâr and Ghâfir denote forgiving or protecting, while 'Afûw indicates complete removal or obliteration of the condition.
(Also written as al-ghaffar, al-ghaffaar, the All-Forgiving: ya ghaffar, ya ghaffaar)
al-Fattâhaudiocaligraphy

The Opener, The Revealer, The Granter of Success


The One who is the judge and revealer. The One who opens what is closed. The One who is the judge of what shall be opened.
The One by whose guidance that which was closed is opened and the unclear is made clear. The One who lifts veils and who opens the heart.
The One who unties the knots, and softens that which was hardened. The One who continually offers goodness and mercy.
The One who gives victory. The One who opens the door to success. The One who holds the keys to victory and success. The One who reveals the solution to all problems.

From the root f-t-h which has the following classical Arabic connotations
to open, unlock, unfold
to make victorious
to reveal, inform, explain, make clear
to judge, decide
to grant, permit
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 34:26
The name of first chapter of the Qur'ân, al-Fâtiha, is based on this same root, and is generally translated as The Opener, or The Opening.

The Arabic word miftâhî, translated as key, meaning that which opens or unlocks, is also based on this same root.
(Also written as al-fattah, al-fattaah, the Opener, the Revealer: ya fattah, ya fattaah)
az-Zâhir audiocaligraphy

The Manifest, The Conspicuous, The Evident

The One who has manifest all of creation and who is manifest in all of creation.
The One whose nature and existence is demonstrated in all of creation.
The One whose essence and attributes are shown throughout all of creation.
The One who is above creation, yet who is made visible through creation.
From the root z-h-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:



al-Wâsi' audiocaligraphy

The All-Embracing, The All-Sufficient, The All-Pervading, The Boundless

The One whose expansive essence holds and embraces all of creation.
The One who is vast without limit. The One of limitless capacity and abundance.
The One who is ample-giving, all-embracing and all-pervading.
The One whose power, knowledge, mercy and generosity are boundless.
From the root w-s-' which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be sufficient in capacity or size, wide, spacious
to be ample, plentiful, bountiful, rich
to comprehend, embrace, include, take in, pervade
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 2:115
(Also written as al-wasi, al-waasi, al-vasi, al-vaasi, the All-Embracing: ya wasi, ya waasi )




al-Wârith audiocaligraphy

The Inheritor, The Supreme Heir

The One who remains after all of creation has perished. The One to whom all returns.
The One who has everlasting ownership of all that has ever been and that will ever be.
The One to whom all possessions return when the possessor is gone. The One who inherits all that we have done.
From the root w-r-th which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to inherit
to be an heir, survivor
to be the owner or sustainer after someone
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 15:23
After all greed, lust, misunderstanding and selfishness have been laid to rest, the One who remains is al-Wârith.
When one surrenders, and lets go of all worldly things, the One who remains is al-Wârith.
All that we possess, even our bodies, are only on loan for a moment.
(Also written as al-warith, al-waarith, al-varith, the Inheritor: ya warith, ya waarith )



al-Walî audiocaligraphy

The Protecting Friend, The Loving Defender, The Nearby Guardian

The One who is lover, protector and lord. The One who is lovingly supportive.
The One who is the protecting friend. The One who guards and rules all of creation.
The One who lovingly guides mankind to turn toward the path of righteousness.
From the root w-l-y which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be near, close, nearby
to be a friend, helper, supporter
to defend, guard (lit. friendly dealing)
to be in charge, to turn one toward something
to be the master, owner, lord
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 42:28
According to Râghib, the root w-l-y indicates one thing taking place by the side of another in such a way that there is no distance between them, both physical and figurative.
Wâlî emphasizes the aspects of lordship, ownership and mastery of the One who is also friend and helper.
Walî emphasizes the nearness and loving, protective, guarding and helping aspects of the One who is also the lord and master.
(Also written as al wali, al walee, al-waliy, al-waliyy, al-vali, al-valee, the nearest friend: ya wali, ya walee)



al-Wâlî audiocaligraphy

The Sole Governor, The Friendly Lord, The Protective Ruler

The One who is the sole planner, implementer, governor and ruler of all things.
The One who is the supportive, helpful master of all things.
The One who is the friendly and protective ruler and governor of all of creation.
From the root w-l-y which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be near, close, nearby
to be a friend, helper, supporter, maintainer
to defend, guard (lit. friendly dealing)
to be in charge, to turn one toward something
to be the master, owner, lord
The name Wâlî is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.
Wâlî emphasizes the aspects of lordship, ownership and mastery of the One who is also friend and helper.
Walî emphasizes the nearness and protective, supportive, guarding aspects of the One who is also the lord and master.
(Also written as al-wali, al-waalee, al-vali, the Protective Lord: ya wali, ya waalee)



al-Wakîl audiocaligraphy

The Trustee, The Guardian, The Disposer of Affairs, The Advocate

The One and only One who can be entrusted with the management and resolution of all affairs. The One who is the supreme trustee, guardian and administrator of all things.
The One who may be trusted to do better for us that we can do for ourselves. The One who can be entrusted to provide the perfect resolution for all matters.
From the root w-k-l which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to appoint or entrust for the care or management of something
to have a commissioned agent, a guardian of one's interests
to rely upon, confide in, lean upon, submit to
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 6:102
This same root w-k-l also gives rise to the word tawakkul (or tawakul), which indicates submitting to Allâh, relying upon Allâh, putting one's trust in Allâh.
In Farsi/Urdu the "w" is commonly transliterated as "v", as in al-Vakîl.
One's trust in Allâh should not be allowed to breed laziness or lack of care, but rather one must always do one's own personal best, and then leave the rest to Allâh, as indicated so clearly by the Prophet Muhammad when he said:
“Tie your camel, then put your trust in Allâh.”
(Also written as al-wakil, al-wakeel, al-vakil, al-vakeel, the Trustee: ya wakil, ya wakeel )



al-Wâjid audiocaligraphy

The Finder, The All-Perceiving, The Wealthy, The Resourceful

The One who has discovered and obtained everything.
The One who perceives and possesses everything.
The One who has no wants and who lacks nothing.
From the root w-j-d which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to find, discover, attain what was sought
to become aware of something, to perceive, to experience
to gain or possess wealth, property, resources
to be rich, to have abundance
to be without wants
The name Wâjid is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.
The ancient roots of wâjid point toward an open hand holding of every manner of abundance.
(Also written as al-wajid, al-waajid, the All-Perceiving: ya wajid, ya waajid,)


al-Wâhid audiocaligraphy

The One, The Creator of Diversity from Unity, The Manifestation of Unity

The One unique starting point from which all else has arisen.
The One source from which all of creation springs forth.
The One whose unity includes all that appears as diverse, separate or individual.
From the root w-h-d which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be one, to be made one, to be called one
to connect, join, unite
to be unique, singular
to be one apart from others
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 39:4
The ancient roots of Ahad point toward to the essential qualities which describe Unity, while the ancient roots of Wâhid point toward the manifestations which arise from that Unity.
That which is Ahad cannot be divided into parts, or any parts distinguished. That which is Wâhid has the appearance of being divisible into separate parts, or being comprised of separate parts.
Ahad is used to refer to the One, the sole One, the One who was not begotten and who has ever been alone, the One who has no second, the Indivisible.
hid indicates the solitary Starting Point, the One Source, the First of the Many, from which all of creation has arisen as manifestations of Unity. From a human point of view, the manifestations may appear separate and diverse, but in reality they are One.
(Also written as al-wahid, al-waahid, the One: ya wahid, ya waahid)


al-Wahhâb audiocaligraphy

The Most Liberal Bestower, The Great Giver, The Giver of Gifts

The One who continually bestows gifts, favors and blessings upon all of creation.
The One who is the most generous and liberal giver.
The One who gives freely and endlessly, without expectation of any return.

From the root w-h-b which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to give for no compensation, to give as a gift
to donate, to offer as a present, bestow
to give liberally and freely
to grant, endow
to cause something to be
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 3:8
With regard to mankind's role in giving, Abû Hâmid al-Ghazâlî notes that:
Whoever bestows gifts with an eye to some interest to be realized by it sooner or later, be it appreciation, affection or release from blame, or or acquiring distinction of mention - he is neither a giver nor generous, but rather engaged in transaction and recompense. ... But the one who sacrifices all he owns, even his life, for the sake of God alone - such a one is worthy of being named giver and generous.
(Also written as: al-wahhab, al-wahhaab, the Great Giver: ya wahhab, ya wahhaab)



al-Wadûd audiocaligraphy

The Most Loving, The Most Affectionate, The Beloved, The Loving-Kindness

The One who loves. The One who is the source of all love and loving-kindness.
The One Love. The One who is most affectionate. The Beloved.
The One who is deserving of all love and affection. The One who is the goal of the highest love.
From the root w-d-d which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to love
to be affectionate
to long for, to desire, to wish for
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 85:14
(Also written as al-wadud, al-wadood, the Most Loving: ya wadud, ya wadood)

at-Tawwâb audiocaligraphy

The Acceptor of Repentance, The Oft-Forgiving, The Acceptor of our Return

The One who beckons for our return. The One who repeatedly turns mankind toward repentance.
The One who forgives those who return to goodness. The One who restores to grace those who repent.
The One who rewards good deeds. The One who forgives those who forgive others.
From the root t-w-b which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to return
to return to goodness, to repent
to be restored
to be rewarded for deeds
to be repeatedly summoned or called
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 49:12
(Also written as al-tawwab, at-tawwab, al-tawwaab, at-tawwaab, the Acceptor of Repentance: ya tawwab, ya tawwaab, )


ash-Shakûr audiocaligraphy

The Most Grateful, The Most Appreciative, The Rewarder of Good Works

The One who is most thankful for righteousness and bestows great rewards for good deeds.
The One who gratefully gives large rewards, even for a small amount of good work.
The One who acknowledges and bountifully rewards all acts of goodness, thankfulness and praise.
The One who frequently and greatly approves, rewards and forgives.
From the root sh-k-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to praise or commend for a benefit or benefits
to acknowledge beneficence
to offer thanks, acknowledgement
to be thankful, grateful
to produce, supply, give forth bountifully
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 35:30
(Also written as al-shakur, al-shakoor, ash-shakur, ash-shakoor, the Most Grateful: ya shakur, ya shakoor)



ash-Shahîd audiocaligraphy

The Omniscient Witness, The Certifier, The Testifier

The One who directly and ever-presently observes everything in creation. The One from whose knowledge nothing is hidden.
The One who witnesses both that which is seen and that which is unseen. The One who has knowledge of all that happens everywhere at all times.
The One who is the ultimate witness on judgment day.
From the root sh-h-d which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to bear witness
to offer testimony
to have knowledge of, to experience
to be present with
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 85:9
(Also written as al-shahid, al-shaheed, ash-shahid, ash-shaheed, the Testifier: ya shahid, ya shaheed)



as-Samî' audiocaligraphy

The All-Hearing, The Ever-Listening

The One whose hearing and attention comprehends everything. The One who pays attention to every supplication and invocation.
The One who listens to every voice. The One who hears and accepts every word, thought and secret.
The One who listens to everything, perfectly, eternally, without limitations.
From the root s-m-' which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to hear, to listen
to accept, to receive, to be told
to pay attention to, pay regard to
to understand the meaning
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 17:1
Imam al-Ghazâlî has said that in order to explore the depths of an attribute of Allah, one must venture far beyond the human expression of such a quality:
When you elevate the All-Hearing above changes which happen to Him when audible sounds occur, and exalt Him above hearing by ears, you will realize that His hearing is an attribute by which the perfection of the qualities of things heard is disclosed. Whoever does not not take care in considering this matter will inevitably fall into mere anthropomorphism. So, be wary, and be precise when you consider it.
The word samâ' (often written sema in Turkish), which literally means hearing or paying attention to, is commonly used to describe the musical gatherings of the Sufis, especially the great whirling dance of the dervishes.
(Also written as al-sami, al-samee, as-sami, as-samee, the All-Hearing: ya sami, ya samee)




as-Samad audiocaligraphy

The Eternal, The Everlasting, The Satisfier of Every Need

The One who is eternal and above whom there is none. The One who is unaffected, unchanged, and without any needs.
The One who is besought by all, and who is above all. The One who can satisfy every need and without whom no affair could be accomplished.
The One who satisfies every need as it should be satisfied, and not necessarily as mankind might imagine.
The One who is the sole recourse, the only one to turn to. The One upon whom all depend, yet who does not depend on any.
From the root s-m-d which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to endeavor to reach or attain something
to turn to, to need
to direct oneself toward or aim toward something
to set up, to erect something
to remain unaffected, unchanged
to be sublime, everlasting
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 112:2
(Also written as al-samad, as-samad, the Eternal: ya samad)

as-Salâm audiocaligraphy

The Source of Peace, The Flawless, The Source of Wholeness and Well-Being

The One who is perfect, whole, prosperous and content.
The One who is the source of all peace, wholeness and safety.
The One who has rendered all of creation to be perfect, whole, prosperous and content.
The One whose creation is free of imperfections, free of faults and free of error.
From the root s-l-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be peaceful, quiet, tranquil, content, friendly, reconciled
to be free from imperfections, free from faults, complete, whole, sound
to be safe, secure, well, healthy, prosperous
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23
This ancient Semitic root of s-l-m implies every manner of wholeness, completeness and prosperity.
Many seek peace by struggling, battling and trying to impose their will on others, yet external peace will only prevail as a reflection of inner peace. The only path to outer peace is awareness of the tranquil depths of inner peace, and the only source of such inner peace is the One known as as-Salâm.
According to Râghib the word Islam, which arises form this same s-l-m root, means to enter into salm... which means to enter into peace, or to enter into wholeness. That is, the word Islam means to be at peace with or reconciled with the ways and decrees of Allâh, and is often described as self-resignation, surrender or submission to the will of Allâh.
(Also written as al-salam, as-salam, al-salaam, as-salaam, the Source of Peace: ya salam, ya salaam)


ar-Razzâq audiocaligraphy

The Provider, The Providence, The Supplier, The Bestower of Sustenance

The One who creates all means of nourishment and subsistence. The One who is the giver of all things beneficial, both physical and spiritual. The One who provides everything that is needed.
The One who causes the means of subsistence to come. The One who bestows all means of support and growth, for the body, the mind and the spiritual life.

From the root r-z-q which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to receive something beneficial, especially as a gift
to be provided with the necessities of life
to receive a portion, share or lot
to be supplied with a means of subsistence
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 51:58
The root r-z-q points to the idea of the receiving of anything beneficial, particularly a gift, whereby something is nourished, sustained, or helped to grow physically, mentally or spiritually.
(Also written as al-razzaq, ar-razzaq, al-razaq, ar-razaq, al-razzaaq, ar-razzaaq, the Provider: ya razzaq, ya razzaaq)



ar-Ra'ûf audiocaligraphy

The Most Kind, The Tenderly Merciful, The Clement and Compassionate

The One who bestows boundless clemency, tenderness and affection.
The One who shows the utmost compassion, pity and tender mercy.
The One whose gentleness, kindness and mercy are beyond understanding.

From the root r-a'-f which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be kind, gentle, clement
to be merciful, compassionate
to show pity
to show tenderness
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 22:65
The term Ra'ûf indicates tender affection and is regarded as the utmost mercy and compassion, the ultimate limit of ar-Rahîm. The meaning is similar to ar-Rahîm, but focuses attention on the utmost tenderness, kindness and affection which accompanies the outpouring of mercy and compassion.
(Also written as al-ra'uf, ar-ra'uf, al-ra'oof, ar-ra'oof, al-rauf, ar-rauf, al-raoof, ar-raoof, the Most Kind and Affectionate: ya ra'uf, ya ra'oof, ya rauf, ya raoof )

ar-Rashîd audiocaligraphy

The Director to the Right Way, The Appointer of the Right Path, The Unerring Director

The One who unerringly decrees, appoints or ordains the right way. The One who is the supreme director to the right path and right belief.
The One who perfectly and righteously directs all matters toward their proper conclusion. The One who needs no aid to direct all affairs rightly.

From the root r-sh-d which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be directed aright
to be caused to follow the right course
to be directed to take the right way
to be caused to hold a right belief
to adopt the right path
The name Rashîd is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.
The name al-Rashîd, according to the dictionary Lisân al-'Arab by al-Mukarram, denotes:
The One who is the Director to the right way, and the One whose regulations are conducted to the attainment of their ultimate objects in the right way, without anyone's aiding in directing their course aright.
Rashîd refers primarily to being directed to, or set upon, the appointed right path with supreme certainty of the intended outcome, while Hâdî refers primarily to the continuing guidance, leadership and direction that is kindly provided to reach the path and also along the path until the goal is achieved.
The word murshid, meaning a director to the right path, is also derived from this same r-sh-d root.
(Also written as al-rashid, al-rasheed, Director to the Right Path: ya rashid, ya rasheed)



ar-Raqîb audiocaligraphy

he Watcher, The All-Observing, The Witness, The Watchful

The One who watches all things. The One who is the ever vigilant witness.
The One from whose observation nothing is hidden. The One who observes all thoughts, deeds and feelings.
From the root r-q-b which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to look, watch, be vigilant
to expect, anticipate, await
to keep an eye on, detect, observe
to be mindful of
to be a spy, scout, observer
to regard, hold in consideration, respect
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 4:1
Related names:
Raqîb refers to the One who has the attribute of watchfulness.
Wakîl refers to the One who is the trusted administrator.
Hafîz refers to the One who protects and preserves.
Mâni' - the One who protects and defends against harmful situations.
Muhaymin refers to the One who is the ever-watchful guardian and protector.
(Also written as al-raqib, al-raqeeb, the Watcher: ya raqib, ya raqeeb)


ar-Rahmân audiocaligraphy

The Most Lovingly Beneficent, The Most Kind and Giving, The Most Gracious, The Infinitely Good

The One who continually showers all of creation with blessings and prosperity without any disparity. The One who is most kind, loving and merciful.
The One whose endless, loving mercy is perfect and inclusive. The One who is overflowing with the quality of loving mercy and is continually pouring it upon all of creation.
The One whose perfect mercy and loving beneficence endlessly embrace all of creation. The One who loves and cherishes all of creation. The One who is most loving, gentle and merciful.
From the root r-h-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to have tenderness, gentleness, kindness
to love
to have mercy, to have pity
to show favor and goodness
to have all that is required for beneficence
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 1:1
The root r-h-m also indicates womb; meaning that which provides protection and nourishment, and that from which all of creation is brought into being.
Rahmân conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness, indicating the great quality of love and mercy which engulfs all of creation without any effort or request on our part, while Rahîm conveys the idea of constant renewal and giving liberal reward to those who are deserving.
Al-Rahmân is the Beneficent One whose endless outpouring of love and mercy are continually showered upon all of creation, while al-Rahîm is the Merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested as that which is received as the consequence of one's deeds.
According to Ibn Qayyum (1350 AD), Rahmân describes the quality of abounding Grace which is inherent in and inseparable from the Almighty.
In Muhammad Ali's translation of the Qur'ân, he refers to classical sources (as indicated by the initials in parenthesis) who said:
Rahmân and Rahîm are both derived from the root rahmat, signifying tenderness requiring the exercise of beneficence [kindness] (R), and thus comprising the ideas of love and mercy.
Al-Rahmân and al-Rahîm are both active participle nouns of different measures denoting intensiveness of significance, the former being of the measure of fa'lân and indicating the greatest preponderance of the quality of mercy, and the later being of the measure of fa'îl and being expressive of a constant repetition and manifestation of the attribute (AH).
The Prophet is reported to have said: "Al-Rahmân is the beneficent One whose love and mercy are manifested in the creation of the world, and al-Rahîm is the merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested in the state that comes after" (AH), i.e as a consequence of the deeds of men. Thus the former is expressive of the utmost degree of love and generosity, the latter of unbounded and constant favor and mercy.
Lexicologists agree in holding that the former includes both the believer and the unbeliever for its objects, while the latter relates specifically to the believer (LL).
In the Dictionary of the Holy Qur'ân, Abdul Omar quotes from classical resources:
Rahmân is an active participle noun of the measure fa'lân which conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness and indicates the greatest preponderance of the quality of love and mercy which comprehends the entire universe without regard to our effort or asking, even before we are born. The creation of the sun, the moon, air and water, etc are all there because of this attribute.... the term Rahmân circumscribes the quality of abounding Grace inherent in and inseparable from the Almighty.
Rahîm is in the measure of fa'îl and denotes the idea of constant repetition and giving of a liberal reward to those who deserve it and seek it. The Manifestation of this attribute is in response to and is a result of the action of the human being. That is, Rahîm indicates that which is extremely and continuously loving and merciful, and who is the dispenser of grace and love as a result of our deeds and supplications, and the One in whom the attribute is constantly and [endlessly] repeated.
(Also written as al-rahman, al-rahmaan, ar-rahman, ar-rahmaan, the Lovingly Beneficent: ya rahman, ya rahmaan,)

ar-Rahîm audiocaligraphy

The Most Merciful, The Most Compassionate

The One who grants even more grace and greater rewards in response to our good actions and high thoughts.
The One who greatly rewards those who use the Divine bounties and beneficence in a good way.
The One who has mercy on the merciful.

From the root r-h-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to have tenderness, gentleness, kindness
to love
to have mercy, to have pity
to show favor and goodness
to have all that is required for beneficence
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 1:1
The root r-h-m also indicates womb; meaning that which provides protection and nourishment, and that from which all of creation is brought into being.
Rahmân conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness, indicating the great quality of love and mercy which engulfs all of creation without any effort or request on our part, while Rahîm conveys the idea of constant renewal and giving liberal reward to those who are deserving.
Al-Rahmân is the Beneficent One whose endless outpouring of love and mercy are continually showered upon all of creation, while al-Rahîm is the Merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested as that which is received as the consequence of one's deeds.
According to Ibn Qayyum (1350 AD), Ram expresses the continuous manifestation of the Grace in our lives and its effect upon us as a result of our own activities.
In Muhammad Ali's translation of the Qur'ân, he refers to classical sources (as indicated by the initials in parenthesis) who said:
Rahmân and Rahîm are both derived from the root rahmat, signifying tenderness requiring the exercise of beneficence [kindness] (R), and thus comprising the ideas of love and mercy.
Al-Rahmân and al-Rahîm are both active participle nouns of different measures denoting intensiveness of significance, the former being of the measure of fa'lân and indicating the greatest preponderance of the quality of mercy, and the later being of the measure of fa'îl and being expressive of a constant repetition and manifestation of the attribute (AH).
The Prophet is reported to have said: "Al-Rahmân is the beneficent One whose love and mercy are manifested in the creation of the world, and al-Rahîm is the merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested in the state that comes after" (AH), i.e as a consequence of the deeds of men. Thus the former is expressive of the utmost degree of love and generosity, the latter of unbounded and constant favor and mercy.
Lexicologists agree in holding that the former includes both the believer and the unbeliever for its objects, while the latter relates specifically to the believer (LL).
In the Dictionary of the Holy Qur'ân, Abdul Omar quotes from classical resources:
Rahmân is an active participle noun of the measure fa'lân which conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness and indicates the greatest preponderance of the quality of love and mercy which comprehends the entire universe without regard to our effort or asking, even before we are born. The creation of the sun, the moon, air and water, etc are all there because of this attribute.... the term Rahmân circumscribes the quality of abounding Grace inherent in and inseparable from the Almighty.
Rahîm is in the measure of fa'îl and denotes the idea of constant repetition and giving of a liberal reward to those who deserve it and seek it. The Manifestation of this attribute is in response to and is a result of the action of the human being. That is, Rahîm indicates that which is extremely and continuously loving and merciful, and who is the dispenser of grace and love as a result of our deeds and supplications, and the One in whom the attribute is constantly and [endlessly] repeated.
(Also written as al-rahim, al-raheem, ar-rahim, ar-raheem, the Most Merciful: ya rahim, ya raheem)



ar-Râfi' audiocaligraphy

The Uplifter, The Exalter

The One whose wisdom chooses the ones to be uplifted.
The One who uplifts and elevates mankind above petty desires and selfishness.
The One who makes it possible to rise above the differences and distinctions that divide mankind.

From the root r-f-' which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to raise or elevate something
to uplift, to take it up
to make high, lofty
to exalt, make honorable, make eminent
to bring a thing near
The name Râfi' is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.
Râfi' (uplifter) is the opposite of Khâfid (humbler).
The names Khâfid and Râfi' are often used together to acknowledge the way that balance and harmony are established and maintained though the interplay of cause and effect.
Mu'izz (honorer) is similar to, but much more more intensive and glorious than, Râfi' (uplifter).
The phrase al Khâfid ur Râfi' is often used to honor these complimentary attributes. ad darr un nafi
(Also written as al-rafi, ar-rafi, al-raafi, ar-raafi, the Uplifter: ya rafi ,ya raafi)



al-Quddûs audiocaligraphy

The Most Holy, The Most Pure, The All-Perfect

The One who is pure, spotless, without blemish or fault.
The One who is far from, and untouched by, worldly imperfections or faults.
The One whose essence and attributes are of unimaginable purity and perfection.
The One who is beyond all human understanding of purity, perfection and holiness.
From the root q-d-s which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to be pure, clean, spotless
to be far removed from impurity or imperfection
to be holy, sacred, hallowed
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23
The ancient roots of the Arabic word Quddûs, as well as the Hebrew word Kadosh, point toward that which is set apart, different, that which is 'other'. Thus, al-Quddûs is known as the One who is set apart, distinctly different and separate from all worldly imperfections, sins and faults, the One whose perfection and righteousness are so 'other' that they cannot be grasped by mankind, the truly Blessed One.
The name al-Quddûs describes the unique, unimaginable purity and perfection that is Allâh, the One whose goodness and righteousness are beyond our understanding.
According to al-Qurturbi, the name al-Quddûs also describes the One who is glorified and revered by the angels.
The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines the word holy as:
Holy -- Exalted or worthy of complete devotion as one perfect in goodness and righteousness.
(Also written as al-quddus, al-quddoos, the Most Holy: ya quddus, ya quddoos)



al-Qayyûm audiocaligraphy

The Self-Subsisting, The Self-Existing One upon Whom all others depend

The One whose nature it is to exist. The One who is free of any dependence on anything else for existence.
The One through whom all things arise. The One by whom all things are eternally managed aright.
The Ever-Living, Self-Existing One who is the foundation upon which all things exist.
From the root q-w-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to stand up, to rise up, to ascend, become high
to begin, to start, to come to pass
to arise, to set out
to be on-going, to exist
to be founded, to be built on
to undertake, to carry out, to manage
to make aright, straighten out, accurate, exact
to make righteous, upright
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 2:255
The attributes of al-Hayy and al-Qayyûm are often used to together, with al-Hayy signifying the attribute of ever-lasting life, and al-Qayyûm signifying the attribute of self-existing life. Thus, the attributes of al-Hayy and al-Qayyûm express two aspects of the One Life.
Abu Hurairah reported that whenever the Prophet, peace be upon him, was faced with a serious difficulty, he would raise his head to the sky and supplicate, "Subhan-Allah al-'Azim (glory be to Allah, the Mighty)." And when he implored seriously and strongly, he would say "Ya Hayyu, Ya Qayyum (O Ever-Living One, O Self-Existing One upon Whom we all depend)." (hadith of Tirmidhi)
The attribute of al-Qayyûm is also nicely described by the words of Acts 17:28 which say:
in Him we live and move and have our being
The name al-Qayyûm also has much the same meaning as the Hebrew phrase in Exodus 3:14 which is written as:
hebrew
and which is often translated as I am that I am, or I am that which I have become.
As Sri Aurobindo wrote in his commentary of the Isha Upanishad:
God is the only Being and all other existences are only His becomings.
The word mustaqîm, also from this same q-w-m root, means straight, righteous, upright, rising upwards or ascending.
(Also written as al-qayyum, al-qayyoom, the Self-Existing: ya qayyum, ya qayyoom)



al-Qahhâr audiocaligraphy

The Ever-Dominating, The Conqueror, The Prevailer

The One who prevails over all of creation. The One who overcomes all obstacles.
The One who is victorious over any opposition. The One whose will is irresistible.
The One who is dominant. The Ever-Dominating One.
The One who is master of all. The One to whom all submit.
From the root q-h-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to overcome, conquer
to overpower, master
to dominate over, prevail
to subdue, subjugate,
to compel against one's wishes
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 39:4
The names Qahhâr (ever-dominating, overpowering) and Latîf (subtle, refined) are sometimes used together to honor and appreciate the opposing, yet complementary, ways of the One.
Related names:
Qawî - Strong - the One who is all-mighty and possesses inexhaustible strength.
Matîn - Firm - the One whose nature it is to be firm, determined and steadfast.
Qahhâr - Dominator - the One who dominates, conquers, overpowers
Muqtadir - Determiner - the One who uses supreme power to enforce whatever Divine wisdom decrees or decides.
(Also written as al-qahhar, al-qahhaar, the Conqueror: ya qahhar, ya qahhaar,)



al-Qâdir audiocaligraphy

The All-Capable, The Most Able, The All-Powerful

The One who possesses the power and the ability to measure-out anything and everything.
The One who has the capability to make any decree and to determine what will be.
The One whose decree determines the measure and distribution of all things.
The One who does as He wills, acting or not acting in accord with whatever He decides.
From the root q-d-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to measure something
to make manifest the measure of something
to distribute or apportion (as though by measure), measure-out
to decree, to ordain, to decide a matter (as though measuring it to fit)
to exercise thought in preparing something, to make use of reason (measuring out)
to have the power to accomplish, to be rendered able, capable
to be able to prevail, to be empowered, to have control over
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 77:23, 6:37
Muqtadir is an intensive form of the root q-d-r which emphasizes the Supreme Power to enforce or enact whatever Divine wisdom decides; being omnipotent, having the ability to do everything.
Qâdir is a less intensive form of the root q-d-r which describes the attribute of being able to decree, ordain, appoint, measure-out, decide.
These both involve power in the sense of power being the intention by which something comes into being according to a certain measure and a certain willful decree, as in saying 'kun' (Be!), and it is.
Related names:
Qawî - the One who is all-mighty and possesses inexhaustible strength.
Matîn - the One whose nature it is to be firm, determined, steadfast.
Qâdir - the One whose nature it is to decree, ordain, appoint, measure-out, decide.
Muqtadir - the One whose supreme power enforces whatever Divine wisdom decrees or decides; omnipotent, able to do everything.
(Also written as al-qadir, al-qaadir, the Most Able: ya qadir, ya qaadir,)



al-Qâbi audiocaligraphy

The Withholder, The Restrainer, The Constrictor

The One whose wisdom causes withholding, either physically or spiritually. The One whose wisdom decides when to withhold something, or make something scarce.
The One whose wisdom may elect to withhold joy and expansion of the heart.
The One in whose hand all hearts are held. The One whose hand collects all souls at the time of death.
From the root q-b-d which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to take in the hand, clutch, lay hold of
to grasp, grip, seize, hold firmly
to have absolute ownership of something (hold in the hand)
to give and take (hand over and take in hand), barter
to contract, shrink, draw together, collect together
to draw in (as a bird contracting a wing)
to withhold, make scanty, make scarce
to contract the heart, i.e. distress, depression, lack of joy
The name Qâbid is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.
The underlying roots of Qâbid give a sense of give and take, a movement back and forth, an underlying rhythm of ebb and flow, like the rhythmical folding and unfolding of a bird's wings in flight, or the rising and setting of the sun, or the endless cycles of life and death.
Qâbid (constrictor) and Bâsit (expander) are opposites.
The Arabic lexicon and commentary Tâj al-'Arûs, as interpreted by E.W. Lane, says:
Qabd [Qâbid] and Bast [Bâsit] are terms applied by the investigators of truth among the Sûfîs to the two contrary states of the heart, from both of which it is seldom or never free: the former being an affection of the heart withholding it from dilation and joy; whether the cause thereof be known, as the remembrance of a sin or an offense, or of an omission, or be not known...
(Also written as al-qabid, al-qaabid, the Giver: ya qabid, ya qaabid,)



an-Nûr audiocaligraphy

The Light, The Illuminator, The One who Reveals

The One who is the divine light of all the worlds. The One whose light who illuminates the heart.
The One who is the light of wisdom and guidance. The One whose light clarifies, manifests and reveals.
The One light by which the obscure is made clear. The One who clears away all darkness and directs aright.
From the root n-w-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to give light, to illuminate, to fill with light
to clarify, to reveal, to make visible
to blossom, to be in bloom (revealed)
to be flaming, blazing and apparent to the senses
to enlighten, give counsel, give advice
This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 24:35
Surah an-Nur (24:35) has a beautiful, mystical passage from the Qur'ân describing the Light:
Allâh is the light of the heavens and the earth. A likeness of His light is as a pillar on which is a lamp - the lamp is in a glass, the glass is as it were a brightly shining star - lit from a blessed olive-tree, neither eastern nor western, the oil whereof gives light, though fire touch it not - light upon light. Allâh guides to His light whom He pleases. And Allâh sets forth parables for men, and Allâh is Knower of all things.
tr by Muhammad Ali
(Also written as al-nur, an-nur, al-noor, an-noor, the Light: ya nur, ya noor, )



an-Nâfi' audiocaligraphy

The Creator of Good, The Benefiter, The Propitious, The Auspicious

The One who helps and who grants all advantages. The One who creates all that produces benefit and usefulness.
The One who grants all favorable circumstances. The One who confers all benefits.
The One who is continually blessing all of creation with goodness and all that is useful. The One through whom all needs are fulfilled.
From the root n-f-' which has the following classical Arabic connotations:
to profit, to be of use
to be beneficial, useful
to have the use of something
The name Nâfi' is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.
Nâfi' (creator of good) is the opposite of Dârr (distresser).
The names Dârr and Nâfi' are often used together to acknowledge the way that balance and harmony are established and maintained. These opposing attributes are often inseparable, since that which is the sweetest nectar to one person may be bitter poison to another.
Such opposites help to make one aware that every action accomplishes some purpose and is, in the grand scheme of things, subservient to the all-knowing hand of Allâh, through whom balance and harmony are created and maintained... even if we don't understand.
Shaikh Tosun Bayrak wrote:
When man looks at the universe, what he sees is Allâh's will, what he with is Allâh's will, what he sees is Allâh's will, and what he seems to have chosen is Allâh's will.
And in that manner, the pairs of opposites serve to remind one to constantly focus our attention on the glory of the One, regardless of whether the situation is smooth and easy or rough and difficult.
There is only one virtue
and one sin for a soul on the path:
virtue when he is conscious of God
and sin when he is not.
Abu Hashim Madani
The phrase ad-Dârr un Nâfi' is is often recited to honor these two complementary attributes. ad darr un nafi
(Also written as al-nafi, al-naafi, the Creator of Good: y anafi, ya naafi)



Appendix B

References

The following texts are the primary reference texts used in compiling the definitions of each of the Beautiful Names as presented on this web site:
The Most Beautiful Names, Sheikh Tosun Bayrak
The Ninety Nine Beautiful Names of God, by al-Ghazâlî, tr by Burrell and Daher
Asmâ' ul Husnâ, the 99 Beautiful Names of Allâh, Bawa Muhaiyaddeen
Ninety-Nine Names of Allah, Shems Friedlander
The Meaning of the Names of Our Lord, Sidi Shaykh Muhammad Sa'id al-Jamal
Irshad, Wisdom of a Sufi Master, Sheikh Muzzafer Ozak al-Jerrahi
The Holy Qur'ân: Translation and Commentary by Abdullah Yusef Ali
The Holy Qur'ân: with English Translation and Commentary, by Muhammad Ali
Dictionary of the Holy Qur'ân, Abdul Mannân Omar... truly a precious gift to those who speak English, this magnificent dictionary translates every classical Arabic word used used in the Qur'ân into English, giving the Arabic root word followed by English translations of every form of that root which appears in the Qur'ân. This dictionary is easy to use, is relatively inexpensive and is based on classical Arabic.
An Arabic-English Lexicon, Edward W. Lane... an eight volume masterpiece of classical Arabic which includes plentiful examples of classical usage and the meanings of the words during the time period that the Qur'ân was revealed. Indexed by Arabic roots, with definitions in English.
A Dictionary and Glossary of the Koran, John Penrice... useful, but is said to occasionally rely upon somewhat less accurate references than the previously cited works by Lane and Omar.
Vocabulary of the Holy Quran, compiled by Abdullah Abbas al-Nadwi... the definitions are very brief and rarely cover the full breadth of meaning of the words.

Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, edited by J.M. Cowan... this text is specifically addressed to modern, not classical, Arabic, yet it generally does a very good job of including the classical meanings of the roots.

Audio

The audio recitation of the Beautiful Names is by Nazir Shaheen, digitally edited from the SoundVision four-CD set 99 Names of Allah, which was originally broadcast on Living Islam from Chicago by Radio Islam .

http://wahiduddin.net/


Wahiduddin Richard Shelquist



Nasheeds, Songs, Chants of the 99 Beautiful Names

Here are a couple of exquisite chants of the Beautiful Names featuring Seemi Ghazi and Amir O'Loughlin:
Beautiful Names - Chant #1 - mp3 - Seemi chanting the 99 names
Beautiful Names - Chant #2 - mp3 - Seemi and Amir singing Ya Allah song
Here are a few more songs and chants of the Beautiful Names that I've found on the internet... enjoy!
Beautiful Names - Chant #3 - mp3

Beautiful Names - Chant #4 - mp3

Beautiful Names - Chant #5 - mp3

Beautiful Names - Chant #6 - mp3
Beautiful Names - on YouTube, chant by Owais Raza Qadri

Beautiful Names - on YouTube, chant by Kamaluddin
Beautiful Names - on YouTube, chant by Hijjaz

Download to your computer: To download mp3 files directly to your hard-drive so that you can play the songs without being connected to the internet, point your mouse at the song title, and click with the RIGHT mouse button, in Microsoft Internet Explorer select "Save target as...", then store the song in a folder where you can easily access the song to play it later.

Troubleshooting: If you have difficulty hearing these songs on your computer, here is a troubleshooting guide which also has recommendations for free downloads of audio players.

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